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Recent WiSE News: 2008-2009

Member of  the USC WiSE community regularly make headlines for their research and achievements. Please visit the links below for recent news about the WiSE Program and WiSE-affiliated faculty, students and postdoctoral scholars.

May 2009

Former WiSE Undergraduate Fellow, Viterbi Student, Mary David, wins Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship

Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Burcin Becerik-Gerber, Profiled

 

April 2009

Urbashi Mitra Recognized for Service by Viterbi School of Engineering

Sarah Bottjer and Maja Mataric Honored with 2009 USC-Mellon Awards for Excellence in Mentoring

2008-09 WiSE Research Fellows Present their Work at the Undergraduate Symposium for Scholarly and Creative Work

 

March 2009

Andrea Armani receives Office of Naval Research (ONR) Young Investigator Award

WiSE Women Recognized at 2009 “Remarkable Women” Awards Ceremony

 

February 2009

Hopf Algebras and Related Topics Conference Held at USC in in honor of Professor Susan Montgomery.

 

January 2009

Maria Todorovska among 18 prominent women in civil engineering selected worldwide as role models for aspiring female engineering students. Todorovska, a research professor in the Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is internationally known for her research in earthquake engineering and engineering seismology.

 

December 2008

Sarah Bottjer Among AAAS Fellows Neurobiologist Sarah Bottjer was honored among 5 USC faculty by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in recognition of their outstanding contributions in science and engineering.

 

September 2008

She Did the Math Pianist/computational engineer Elaine Chew discusses advantages of an operations research approach to new musical search technologies.

Robot Interaction May Help Youngsters USC studies document that children with autism disorders actively interact with robots. Creation of therapy tools is the next step.

Breaking Up Is Hard to Do Science study provides first proof of an unlikely phenomenon involving three-way splits of a molecule.